This is our QUEST Working Together Towards a Cure

OUR WAR AGAINST CANCER
Harnessing the Natural Order of Our Immune System
Living Drugs in a Bag® therapy
Next-Generation Immunotherapy

NK cell:
An immune cell that can recognize stressed, diseased, or cancerous cells and kill them. NantKwest’s NK cell lines can be grown in large quantities and can be targeted to cancer cells through our unique technology.

NK cell:
An immune cell that can recognize stressed, diseased, or cancerous cells and kill them. NantKwest’s NK cell lines can be grown in large quantities and can be targeted to cancer cells through our unique technology.

CD16:
A molecule that can be expressed on the surface of NantKwest’s NK cells that allows NK cells to use antibodies to target diseased cells.

CD16:
A molecule that can be expressed on the surface of NantKwest’s NK cells that allows NK cells to use antibodies to target diseased cells.

Antibody:
A type of molecule both naturally produced by the body and developed for therapeutic use that allows the immune system to specifically recognize and target diseased cells. NK cells can use antibodies to kill diseased cells via CD16 in a process called antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC).

Antibody:
A type of molecule both naturally produced by the body and developed for therapeutic use that allows the immune system to specifically recognize and target diseased cells. NK cells can use antibodies to kill diseased cells via CD16 in a process called antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC).

CAR (Chimeric Antigen Receptor):
A type of molecule similar to an antibody that can be expressed on NantKwest’s NK cells to directly allow them to target diseased cells.

CAR (Chimeric Antigen Receptor):
A type of molecule similar to an antibody that can be expressed on NantKwest’s NK cells to directly allow them to target diseased cells.

Cytokines:
Molecules secreted by NK cells that signal other immune cells to help by telling them to activate or travel to the site of diseased or cancerous cells.

Cytokines:
Molecules secreted by NK cells that signal other immune cells to help by telling them to activate or travel to the site of diseased or cancerous cells.

Cytotoxic Granules:
Small containers within NK cells that store proteins called perforins and granzymes that can kill diseased cells when released by an NK cell.

Cytotoxic Granules:
Small containers within NK cells that store proteins called perforins and granzymes that can kill diseased cells when released by an NK cell.

Meet Our NK Cell Family

haNK® Helps Antibodies Kill Better

See-haNK-in-Action

taNK® Directly Targets Cancer Cells


See taNK® in Action

t-haNK™ Targets Two or More


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Therapeutic Areas

  • Urothelial Cancer

    Urothelial carcinoma, also known as transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), is by far the most common type of bladder cancer.
    These cancers start in the urothelial cells that line the inside of the bladder. Urothelial cells also line other parts
    of the urinary tract, such as the part of the kidney that connects to the ureter (called the renal pelvis), the ureters,
    and the urethra. Patients with bladder cancer sometimes have other tumors in these places, so the entire urinary tract
    needs to be checked for tumors. Approximately 79,000 new cases of bladder cancer will be diagnosed in the U.S. this year.*
    Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of bladder cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing.
    To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

  • Sarcoma

    A sarcoma is a type of cancer that develops from certain tissues, like bone or muscle. Bone and soft tissue sarcomas are the
    main types of sarcoma. Soft tissue sarcomas can develop from soft tissues like fat, muscle, nerves, fibrous tissues, blood vessels,
    or deep skin tissues. They can be found in any part of the body. Most of them develop in the arms or legs. They can also be found
    in the trunk, head and neck area, internal organs, and the area in back of the abdominal cavity (known as the retroperitoneum).
    Sarcomas are not common tumors, and most cancers are the type of tumors called carcinomas. Osteosarcoma is the most common type of
    cancer that develops in bone. Like the osteoblasts in normal bone, the cells that form this cancer make bone matrix. But the bone
    matrix of an osteosarcoma is not as strong as that of normal bones. Most osteosarcomas occur in children and young adults. Teens are the most commonly
    affected age group, but osteosarcoma can occur at any age. About 12,400 new soft tissue sarcomas will be diagnosed in the U.S. this year.
    *   Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of sarcoma and information obtained from genetic and protein testing.
    To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

  • Glioblastoma multiforme

    Glioma is a general term for a group of tumors that start in glial cells. About 3 out of 10 of all brain tumors are gliomas,
    the fast-growing among brain tumors. Astrocytomas are tumors that start in glial cells called astrocytes. High grade astrocytomas,
    known as glioblastomas (or glioblastoma multiforme), are the fastest growing. These tumors make up about two-thirds of astrocytomas
    and are the most common malignant brain tumors in adults.*   Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of brain
    cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing.
    To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

  • Breast Cancer

    Breast cancer starts as a single abnormal cell in the breast that begins to grow out of control. These cells usually form a tumor that
    can often be seen on an x-ray or felt as a lump. The tumor is malignant (cancerous) if the cells can grow into (invade) surrounding
    tissues or spread (metastasize) to distant areas of the body through the blood stream or lymphatics. Breast cancer occurs almost
    entirely in women, but men can get breast cancer, too. Breast cancers can start from different parts of the breast. Most breast cancers
    begin in the ducts (ductal cancers). There are also other types of breast cancer that are less common. Breast cancer is the second most
    common cancer in American women, with more than 250,000 new cases diagnosed this year. Genetic factors, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2, can
    play a role in development of breast cancer.*   Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of breast cancer and
    information obtained from genetic and protein testing.
    To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

  • Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Triple-negative breast cancer cells don’t have estrogen or progesterone receptors and also don’t have too much of the protein called HER2.
    These cancers tend to be more common in younger women and in women who are African-American or Hispanic/Latina. Triple-negative breast cancers
    grow and spread faster than most other types of breast cancer. Because the cancer cells don’t have hormone receptors, hormone therapy is not
    helpful in treating these cancers. And because they don’t have too much HER2, drugs that target HER2 aren’t helpful, either. Chemotherapy can
    still be useful.*   Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of breast cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing.
    To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

  • Colorectal Cancer

    Colorectal cancer is a cancer that starts in the colon or the rectum. These cancers can also be named colon cancer or rectal cancer, depending
    on where they start. Colon cancer and rectal cancer are often grouped together because they have many features in common. Most colorectal cancers
    begin as a growth called a polyp on the inner lining of the colon or rectum. Some types of polyps can change into cancer over the course of several
    years, but not all polyps become cancer. Colorectal cancer will be diagnosed in an estimated 135,400 persons in the U.S. this year. It is the second
    leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. for men and women combined. It is most commonly found among people age 50 and higher. When colorectal cancer
    is found early, it can often be cured.*   Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of colon cancer and information obtained from
    genetic and protein testing.
    To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

  • Head & Neck Cancer

    There are many types of head and neck cancers. The most common type of cancer in the head and neck area is called carcinoma. These cancers start
    in the cells that line all parts of the nose, mouth, and throat. Some of the most common types include the following. Oral cavity cancer – starts
    in the mouth. Oropharyngeal cancer – starts in back of the mouth or the throat. Nasal cavity cancer – starts in the opening behind the nose, a
    space that runs along the top of the roof of the mouth and then turns downward to join the back of the mouth and the throat. Paranasal sinus cancer –
    starts in the openings around or near the nose called sinuses. Nasopharyngeal cancer – starts in the upper part of the throat behind the nose.
    Laryngeal cancer – starts in the voice box. Hypopharyngeal cancer – starts in the lower part of the throat beside and behind the voice box.
    It is estimated that 63,000 new cases of head and neck cancer will be diagnosed in the U.S. this year. While younger people can develop the
    disease, most people are over age 50 when they are diagnosed.*   Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of head and
    neck cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing.
    To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

  • Lung Cancer

    The 2 main types of lung cancer are small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC), which is sometimes
    called oat cell cancer. About 10% to 15% of lung cancers are SCLC. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which makes up about 80% to 85% of
    lung cancers. The 3 main types of NSCLC are adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and large cell carcinoma. Small cell and non-small cell
    lung cancers are treated differently. Lung cancer is the second most common cancer and is typically diagnosed at an advanced stage. About
    222,500 new cases will be diagnosed this year. Smoking and environmental factors contribute strongly to individual risk of developing lung cancer.*
    Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of lung cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing.
    To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

  • Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Lymphomas are cancers that start in white blood cells called lymphocytes. There are two main types of lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin
    lymphoma, and these behave, spread, and respond to treatment differently. Hodgkin lymphoma usually starts in B lymphocytes. Although Hodgkin lymphoma
    can start almost anywhere, most often it starts in lymph nodes in the upper part of the body. The most common sites are in the chest, neck, or under
    the arms. Hodgkin lymphoma most often spreads through the lymph vessels from lymph node to lymph node. Rarely, late in the disease, it can invade the
    bloodstream and spread to other parts of the body, such as the liver, lungs, and/or bone marrow. Classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) accounts for about 95%
    of all cases of Hodgkin lymphomas in developed countries and has 4 subtypes: nodular sclerosis Hodgkin lymphoma, mixed cellularity Hodgkin lymphoma,
    lymphocyte-rich Hodgkin lymphoma, lymphocyte-depleted Hodgkin lymphoma. About 8,300 new cases of Hodgkin lymphoma will be diagnosed this year in the U.S.*
    Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of lymphoma and information obtained from genetic and protein testing.
    To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

  • Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is one of the most common cancers in the U.S., accounting for about 4% of all cancers. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (also known
    as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, NHL, or sometimes just lymphoma) is a cancer that starts in white blood cells called lymphocytes, which are part of
    the body’s immune system. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can develop from either type of lymphocyte, but B-cell lymphomas are much more common in the United States
    than T-cell lymphomas. Different types of lymphoma can develop from each type of lymphocyte, based on how mature the cells are when they become
    cancerous and other factors. Treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma depends on which type it is, so it’s important for doctors to find out the exact
    type of lymphoma you have. About 72,200 new cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma will be diagnosed this year in the U.S.* Therapeutic decisions rely
    in part on the type and stage of lymphoma and information obtained from genetic and protein testing.
    To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

  • Ovarian Cancer

    Ovarian cancer ranks fifth in cancer deaths among women, accounting for more deaths than any other cancer of the female reproductive system.
    The ovaries are made up of 3 main kinds of cells and each type can develop into a different tumor. Epithelial tumors start from the cells that
    cover the outer surface of the ovary. Most ovarian tumors are epithelial cell tumors. Germ cell tumors start from the cells that produce the
    eggs (ova). Stromal tumors start from structural tissue cells that hold the ovary together and produce the female hormones estrogen and progesterone.
    Most of these tumors are benign (non-cancerous) and never spread beyond the ovary. Benign tumors can be treated by removing either the ovary
    or the part of the ovary that contains the tumor. Malignant (cancerous) or low malignant potential ovarian tumors can spread (metastasize) to
    other parts of the body and can be fatal. About 22,400 women will receive a new diagnosis of ovarian cancer this year in the U.S. Genetic factors,
    such as BRCA1 and BRCA2, can play a role in development of ovarian cancer.*   Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of
    ovarian cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing.
    To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

  • Pancreatic Cancer

    The exocrine cells and endocrine cells of the pancreas form different types of tumors. It’s very important to know if the cancer in the pancreas
    is an exocrine or endocrine cancer. They have distinct risk factors and causes, have different signs and symptoms, are diagnosed with different
    tests, are treated in different ways, and have different outlooks. Exocrine cancers are by far the most common type of pancreas cancer. If you are
    told you have pancreatic cancer, it’s most likely an exocrine pancreatic cancer. Tumors of the endocrine pancreas are uncommon, making up less
    than 5% of all pancreatic cancers. As a group, they are often called pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) or islet cell tumors. About 54,000
    people will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in the U.S. this year.*   Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of
    pancreatic cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing.
    To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

  • Melanoma

    Melanoma is a cancer that begins in the melanocytes. Other names for this cancer include malignant melanoma and cutaneous melanoma.
    Most melanoma cells still make melanin, so melanoma tumors are usually brown or black. But some melanomas do not make melanin and can
    appear pink, tan, or even white. Melanomas can develop anywhere on the skin, but they are more likely to start on the trunk (chest and back)
    in men and on the legs in women. The neck and face are other common sites. Melanoma accounts for only about 1% of all skin cancers, but causes
    a large majority of skin cancer deaths. About 87,100 new melanomas will be diagnosed this year in the U.S.*   Therapeutic decisions rely
    in part on the type and stage of skin cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing.
    To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

  • Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Merkel Cell Carcinoma is an uncommon type of skin cancer. It arises from Merkel cells, which are thought to be a type of neuroendocrine cell,
    and are located mainly in the top layer of the skin. Merkel cell carcinoma starts when Merkel cells grow out of control. Because Merkel cells
    are a type of neuroendocrine cell, MCC is also sometimes called neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin. Another name for MCC is trabecular carcinoma
    (or trabecular cancer). These cancers most often start on sun-exposed parts of the skin, such as the face (the most common site), neck, and arms.
    But MCC can start anywhere on the body. Merkel cell tumors usually appear as firm, pink, red, or purple lumps or bumps on the skin. They are not
    usually painful, but they can grow quickly and can sometimes open up as ulcers or sores. About 1,500 cases of MCC are diagnosed in the U.S. each year.*
    Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of skin cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing.
    To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

  • Chordoma

    This primary tumor of bone usually occurs in the base of the skull and bones of the spine. The best treatment is a wide excision to
    remove the tumor completely with some nearby normal tissue. This is not always possible because the spinal cord and nerves nearby may
    be involved. Still, as much of the tumor as possible will be removed. It develops most often in adults older than 30, and is about twice
    as common in men as in women. Chordomas tend to grow slowly and often do not spread to other parts of the body, but they often come back
    in the same area if they are not removed completely. The lymph nodes, the lungs, and the liver are the most common areas for secondary tumor spread.*
    Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of chordoma and information obtained from genetic and protein testing.
    To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

Therapeutic Areas

Bladder

Urothelial Cancer

Urothelial carcinoma, also known as transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), is by far the most common type of bladder cancer. These cancers start in the urothelial cells that line the inside of the bladder. Urothelial cells also line other parts of the urinary tract, such as the part of the kidney that connects to the ureter (called the renal pelvis), the ureters, and the urethra. Patients with bladder cancer sometimes have other tumors in these places, so the entire urinary tract needs to be checked for tumors. Approximately 79,000 new cases of bladder cancer will be diagnosed in the U.S. this year.* Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of bladder cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing. To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

Bone

Sarcoma

A sarcoma is a type of cancer that develops from certain tissues, like bone or muscle. Bone and soft tissue sarcomas are the main types of sarcoma. Soft tissue sarcomas can develop from soft tissues like fat, muscle, nerves, fibrous tissues, blood vessels, or deep skin tissues. They can be found in any part of the body. Most of them develop in the arms or legs. They can also be found in the trunk, head and neck area, internal organs, and the area in back of the abdominal cavity (known as the retroperitoneum). Sarcomas are not common tumors, and most cancers are the type of tumors called carcinomas. Osteosarcoma is the most common type of cancer that develops in bone. Like the osteoblasts in normal bone, the cells that form this cancer make bone matrix. But the bone matrix of an osteosarcoma is not as strong as that of normal bones. Most osteosarcomas occur in children and young adults. Teens are the most commonly affected age group, but osteosarcoma can occur at any age. About 12,400 new soft tissue sarcomas will be diagnosed in the U.S. this year.* Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of sarcoma and information obtained from genetic and protein testing.  To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

Brain

Glioblastoma multiforme

Glioma is a general term for a group of tumors that start in glial cells. About 3 out of 10 of all brain tumors are gliomas, the fast-growing among brain tumors. Astrocytomas are tumors that start in glial cells called astrocytes. High grade astrocytomas, known as glioblastomas (or glioblastoma multiforme), are the fastest growing. These tumors make up about two-thirds of astrocytomas and are the most common malignant brain tumors in adults.* Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of brain cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing.  To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

Breast

Breast Cancer

Breast cancer starts as a single abnormal cell in the breast that begins to grow out of control. These cells usually form a tumor that can often be seen on an x-ray or felt as a lump. The tumor is malignant (cancerous) if the cells can grow into (invade) surrounding tissues or spread (metastasize) to distant areas of the body through the blood stream or lymphatics. Breast cancer occurs almost entirely in women, but men can get breast cancer, too. Breast cancers can start from different parts of the breast. Most breast cancers begin in the ducts (ductal cancers). There are also other types of breast cancer that are less common. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in American women, with more than 250,000 new cases diagnosed this year. Genetic factors, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2, can play a role in development of breast cancer.* Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of breast cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing. To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

Breast

Triple Negative Breast Cancer

Triple-negative breast cancer cells don’t have estrogen or progesterone receptors and also don’t have too much of the protein called HER2. These cancers tend to be more common in younger women and in women who are African-American or Hispanic/Latina. Triple-negative breast cancers grow and spread faster than most other types of breast cancer. Because the cancer cells don’t have hormone receptors, hormone therapy is not helpful in treating these cancers. And because they don’t have too much HER2, drugs that target HER2 aren’t helpful, either. Chemotherapy can still be useful.* Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of breast cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing.  To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

Colon

Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal cancer is a cancer that starts in the colon or the rectum. These cancers can also be named colon cancer or rectal cancer, depending on where they start. Colon cancer and rectal cancer are often grouped together because they have many features in common. Most colorectal cancers begin as a growth called a polyp on the inner lining of the colon or rectum. Some types of polyps can change into cancer over the course of several years, but not all polyps become cancer. Colorectal cancer will be diagnosed in an estimated 135,400 persons in the U.S. this year. It is the second leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. for men and women combined. It is most commonly found among people age 50 and higher. When colorectal cancer is found early, it can often be cured.* Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of colon cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing.  To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

Head & Neck

Head & Neck Cancer

There are many types of head and neck cancers. The most common type of cancer in the head and neck area is called carcinoma. These cancers start in the cells that line all parts of the nose, mouth, and throat. Some of the most common types include the following. Oral cavity cancer – starts in the mouth. Oropharyngeal cancer – starts in back of the mouth or the throat. Nasal cavity cancer – starts in the opening behind the nose, a space that runs along the top of the roof of the mouth and then turns downward to join the back of the mouth and the throat. Paranasal sinus cancer – starts in the openings around or near the nose called sinuses. Nasopharyngeal cancer – starts in the upper part of the throat behind the nose. Laryngeal cancer – starts in the voice box. Hypopharyngeal cancer – starts in the lower part of the throat beside and behind the voice box. It is estimated that 63,000 new cases of head and neck cancer will be diagnosed in the U.S. this year. While younger people can develop the disease, most people are over age 50 when they are diagnosed.* Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of head and neck cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing. To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

Lung

Lung Cancer

The 2 main types of lung cancer are small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC), which is sometimes called oat cell cancer. About 10% to 15% of lung cancers are SCLC. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which makes up about 80% to 85% of lung cancers. The 3 main types of NSCLC are adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and large cell carcinoma. Small cell and non-small cell lung cancers are treated differently. Lung cancer is the second most common cancer and is typically diagnosed at an advanced stage. About 222,500 new cases will be diagnosed this year. Smoking and environmental factors contribute strongly to individual risk of developing lung cancer.* Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of lung cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing. To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

Lymphoma

Hodgkin Lymphoma

Lymphomas are cancers that start in white blood cells called lymphocytes. There are two main types of lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and these behave, spread, and respond to treatment differently. Hodgkin lymphoma usually starts in B lymphocytes. Although Hodgkin lymphoma can start almost anywhere, most often it starts in lymph nodes in the upper part of the body. The most common sites are in the chest, neck, or under the arms. Hodgkin lymphoma most often spreads through the lymph vessels from lymph node to lymph node. Rarely, late in the disease, it can invade the bloodstream and spread to other parts of the body, such as the liver, lungs, and/or bone marrow. Classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) accounts for about 95% of all cases of Hodgkin lymphomas in developed countries and has 4 subtypes: nodular sclerosis Hodgkin lymphoma, mixed cellularity Hodgkin lymphoma, lymphocyte-rich Hodgkin lymphoma, lymphocyte-depleted Hodgkin lymphoma. About 8,300 new cases of Hodgkin lymphoma will be diagnosed this year in the U.S.* Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of lymphoma and information obtained from genetic and protein testing. To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is one of the most common cancers in the U.S., accounting for about 4% of all cancers. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (also known as non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, NHL, or sometimes just lymphoma) is a cancer that starts in white blood cells called lymphocytes, which are part of the body’s immune system. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can develop from either type of lymphocyte, but B-cell lymphomas are much more common in the United States than T-cell lymphomas. Different types of lymphoma can develop from each type of lymphocyte, based on how mature the cells are when they become cancerous and other factors. Treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma depends on which type it is, so it’s important for doctors to find out the exact type of lymphoma you have. About 72,200 new cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma will be diagnosed this year in the U.S.* Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of lymphoma and information obtained from genetic and protein testing. To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

Ovary

Ovarian Cancer

Ovarian cancer ranks fifth in cancer deaths among women, accounting for more deaths than any other cancer of the female reproductive system. The ovaries are made up of 3 main kinds of cells and each type can develop into a different tumor. Epithelial tumors start from the cells that cover the outer surface of the ovary. Most ovarian tumors are epithelial cell tumors. Germ cell tumors start from the cells that produce the eggs (ova). Stromal tumors start from structural tissue cells that hold the ovary together and produce the female hormones estrogen and progesterone. Most of these tumors are benign (non-cancerous) and never spread beyond the ovary. Benign tumors can be treated by removing either the ovary or the part of the ovary that contains the tumor. Malignant (cancerous) or low malignant potential ovarian tumors can spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body and can be fatal. About 22,400 women will receive a new diagnosis of ovarian cancer this year in the U.S. Genetic factors, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2, can play a role in development of ovarian cancer.* Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of ovarian cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing. To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

Pancreas

Pancreatic Cancer

The exocrine cells and endocrine cells of the pancreas form different types of tumors. It’s very important to know if the cancer in the pancreas is an exocrine or endocrine cancer. They have distinct risk factors and causes, have different signs and symptoms, are diagnosed with different tests, are treated in different ways, and have different outlooks. Exocrine cancers are by far the most common type of pancreas cancer. If you are told you have pancreatic cancer, it’s most likely an exocrine pancreatic cancer. Tumors of the endocrine pancreas are uncommon, making up less than 5% of all pancreatic cancers. As a group, they are often called pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) or islet cell tumors. About 54,000 people will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in the U.S. this year.* Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of pancreatic cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing. To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

Skin

Melanoma

Melanoma is a cancer that begins in the melanocytes. Other names for this cancer include malignant melanoma and cutaneous melanoma. Most melanoma cells still make melanin, so melanoma tumors are usually brown or black. But some melanomas do not make melanin and can appear pink, tan, or even white. Melanomas can develop anywhere on the skin, but they are more likely to start on the trunk (chest and back) in men and on the legs in women. The neck and face are other common sites. Melanoma accounts for only about 1% of all skin cancers, but causes a large majority of skin cancer deaths. About 87,100 new melanomas will be diagnosed this year in the U.S.* Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of skin cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing. To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

Skin

Merkel Cell Carcinoma

Merkel Cell Carcinoma is an uncommon type of skin cancer. It arises from Merkel cells, which are thought to be a type of neuroendocrine cell, and are located mainly in the top layer of the skin. Merkel cell carcinoma starts when Merkel cells grow out of control. Because Merkel cells are a type of neuroendocrine cell, MCC is also sometimes called neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin. Another name for MCC is trabecular carcinoma (or trabecular cancer). These cancers most often start on sun-exposed parts of the skin, such as the face (the most common site), neck, and arms. But MCC can start anywhere on the body. Merkel cell tumors usually appear as firm, pink, red, or purple lumps or bumps on the skin. They are not usually painful, but they can grow quickly and can sometimes open up as ulcers or sores. About 1,500 cases of MCC are diagnosed in the U.S. each year.* Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of skin cancer and information obtained from genetic and protein testing. To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

Spine

Chordoma

This primary tumor of bone usually occurs in the base of the skull and bones of the spine. The best treatment is a wide excision to remove the tumor completely with some nearby normal tissue. This is not always possible because the spinal cord and nerves nearby may be involved. Still, as much of the tumor as possible will be removed. It develops most often in adults older than 30, and is about twice as common in men as in women. Chordomas tend to grow slowly and often do not spread to other parts of the body, but they often come back in the same area if they are not removed completely. The lymph nodes, the lungs, and the liver are the most common areas for secondary tumor spread.* Therapeutic decisions rely in part on the type and stage of chordoma and information obtained from genetic and protein testing. To learn more about our clinical trials CONTACT A CLINICAL CARE COORDINATOR

To learn more about our clinical trials

*(Adapted from American Cancer Society, Cancer A – Z.)


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